First came Force.com, now Microsoft, Google and Oracle all have low-code platforms

In SLINGR Blog by Grace Schroeder

With a shared need for deeper integrations and feature flexibility, customers and vendors are creating push pull market forces driving the demand for low-code solutions. With necessity as the mother of invention, both will look to aPaaS extensibility and as the foundation for innovation. Grace Schroeder CEO,   SLINGR

Low-code platforms have been crawling out of the water since 1999, but it wasn’t until 2014 that Forrester gave them a name. According to Forrester, low-code development platforms are:

Products and/or cloud services for application development that employ visual, declarative techniques instead of programming and are available to customers at low or no cost in money and training time to begin.

The first low-code platforms were enterprise deployments that gave companies a rational way to fill the gaps between legacy systems and customer demands. Many of these platforms require a significant investment in training of the development teams. Today, developers don’t see a career path in learning older platforms. They’re just not hot.
SaaS Titans launch proprietary platforms

There was an eight-year gap between the release of Force.com (2007) and Microsoft’s launch of Power Apps, a low-code platform centered around Office 365. In 2017 Oracle released Project Visual Code and Google soft-launched App Maker — each naturally centered around extending their core suite of solutions.

While industry Titans launch low-code platforms in the continued hope that they can fortify their walled gardens, the rest of the market is flourishing with unique solutions that will forever change the cost structure of work. Distinct artificial intelligence engines are emerging to transform data mayhem into structured outcomes with no human interaction.

It’s easy to predict that companies who cannot avail leverage these technologies will be over-run by competitors who start new industries with them. Witness the adoption of Slack, the fastest growing enterprise software on the planet, whose bots and integrations framework stand to cannibalize incumbents like intercom.io and others.

With a shared need for deeper integrations and feature flexibility, customers and vendors are creating push pull market forces driving the demand for low-code solutions. With necessity as the mother of invention, both will look to aPaaS extensibility and as the foundation for innovation.

Given that dominant market players have more to lose than to gain, vendors and customer alike will need to consider their choices carefully. However, the question is no longer why you would include a low-code aPaaS in your environment, but rather how can you afford not to?

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